The Mass of The Early Christians

The Mass of the Early Christians

Copyright - Mike Aquilina, mikeaquilina.com

Have you ever been bored at the Church’s highest liturgical celebration, the Mass? Have you ever doubted the real presence? Have you ever wondered if Catholicism is still relevant this day in age? Have you wondered if this Sunday Mass thing was just made up by some archaic institution?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then please consider reading this book. It is an introductory text to the early Church Fathers writings on the mass, which was compiled and authored by Mike Aquilina. The book begins at the Last Supper and ends with St. Cyril of Jerusalem in the 4th century, so we are talking about the true roots of Christian worship. Each chapter has a short historical introduction by Mike Aquilina, then the translated text of the actual Church Fathers. Tertullian, St. Clement of Rome, St. Ireneaus, and the Didache, just to name a few who are inside.

This book will shock you! If you ever doubted the Eucharist before, you will be hard pressed to ever again. Click on the image above to purchase.

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2 Responses to “The Mass of The Early Christians”

  1. That is an AWESOME book! It has be a couple years since I’ve read it, but I think I’m going to have to go pull it off the shelf and read it again!

    • sjdemoor85 Says:

      Could not agree more. It completely revolutionized my experience of the Mass and the reception of the Holy Eucharist! I think if this book found its way to the hands of protestants, oh how hearts would transform!

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